TITLE

Time and tide wait for no man

AUTHOR(S)
Shearman, David
PUB. DATE
December 2002
SOURCE
BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);12/21/2002, Vol. 325 Issue 7378, p1466
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Suggests that global warming presents a unique threat to humanity because it is difficult to comprehend responsibility beyond existing descendants. Its effects on reductions in nutrition, economic activity and habitable locations and increases in infectious diseases, as well as physical disasters; Human adaptation to local environmental conditions; Psychological and ideological mechanisms of coping with these effects; Strategies which may be used by physicians, political leaders in greenhouse gas-emitting nations and those with influence over various public health organizations for effecting change.
ACCESSION #
8754385

 

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