TITLE

Be Careful What You Wish For: Why McDonald v. City of Chicago's Rejection of the Privileges or Immunities Clause May Not Be Such a Bad Thing for Rights

AUTHOR(S)
Jackson, Jeffrey D.
PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
Penn State Law Review;2011, Vol. 115 Issue 3, p562
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the purpose of the Privileges or Immunities Clause in context with the U.S. Supreme Court case McDonald v. City of Chicago. It mentions that Privileges or Immunities Clause acts as a vehicle for enumerated and unenumerated rights, for achievement of the aim under substantive due process jurisprudence. It analyzes the role of the McDonald case in revitalizing the Privileges or Immunities Clause.
ACCESSION #
87368218

 

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