TITLE

Geostrategy-Direct - DOSSIER: Mideast allies in U.S. war on terror - Report cites major roles by Egypt and Jordan in CIA's war on terror

PUB. DATE
March 2013
SOURCE
Geo-Strategy Direct;3/13/2013, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Newswire
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a report from the Open Society Foundations on the role played by Jordan and Egypt in a secret U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) program in 2013. The society asserted that Jordan and Egypt worked with the CIA for five years to interrogate and arrest fighters of Al Qaida from Pakistan and Afghanistan. The society said the two states of the Arab League tortured scores of prisoners under the direction of the CIA.
ACCESSION #
86957794

 

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