TITLE

THE MODERATING ROLE OF ATTACHMENT ANXIETY ON SOCIAL NETWORK SITE USE INTENSITY AND SOCIAL CAPITAL

AUTHOR(S)
HAIHUA LIU; JUNQI SHI; YIHAO LIU; ZITONG SHENG
PUB. DATE
February 2013
SOURCE
Psychological Reports;Feb2013, Vol. 112 Issue 1, p252
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This study examined the moderating role of attachment anxiety on the relationship between intensity of social network site use and bridging, bonding, and maintained social capital. Data from 322 undergraduate Chinese students were collected. Hierarchical regression analyses showed positive relationships between online intensity of social network site use and the three types of social capital. Moreover, attachment anxiety moderated the effect of intensity of social network site use on social capital. Specifically, for students with lower attachment anxiety, the relationships between intensity of social network site use and bonding and bridging social capital were stronger than those with higher attachment anxiety. The result suggested that social network sites cannot improve highly anxiously attached individuals' social capital effectively; they may need more face-to-face communications.
ACCESSION #
86694500

 

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