TITLE

A Sea of Change Reforming the International Regime to Prevent, Suppress and Prosecute Sea Piracy

AUTHOR(S)
Anderson, James
PUB. DATE
January 2013
SOURCE
Journal of Maritime Law & Commerce;Jan2013, Vol. 44 Issue 1, p47
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
No abstract available.
ACCESSION #
86181968

 

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