TITLE

The feared Bush brand: Leaker

AUTHOR(S)
Bedard, Paul
PUB. DATE
December 2002
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;12/9/2002, Vol. 133 Issue 22, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Lyndon Johnson would be proud. The current Texan manning the Oval Office continues to take on traits of the first lifelong son of Texas to reside at the White House. Be it the Stetson, the ranch, or his "I'm the boss" attitude, George W. Bush looks more each week like the LBJ of old.Like Johnson before him, Bush hates unsanctioned press leaks so much that he'll put off a decision just to show up the leaker and embarrass the media.Aides say the president will wait days or weeks to announce something that the press says is happening immediately.
ACCESSION #
8617935

 

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