TITLE

The Idea of a Highest Divine Principle--Founding Reason and Spirituality. A Necessary Concept of a Comparative Philosophy?

AUTHOR(S)
Bickmann, Claudia
PUB. DATE
December 2012
SOURCE
Religions;Dec2012, Vol. 3 Issue 4, p1025
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
By reference to the Platonic, Aristotelian, and Neo-Platonic philosophical traditions (and then to German Idealism, including Husserl and Heidegger), I will indicate the way in which the concept of reason--on the one side--depends on the horizon of spirituality (by searching for the ultimate ground within us and the striving for the highest good); and inversely--how far the idea of the divine or our spiritual self may be deepened, understood and transmitted by reference to reason and rationality. But whereas philosophical analysis aims at the universal dimensions of spirituality or the divine (as in Plato's idea of the 'highest good', the Aristotelian 'Absolute substance', the 'Oneness of the One' (Plotinus and the Neo-Platonists) or the Hegelian 'Absolute spirit'),--Comparative Theology may preserve the dimension of spirituality or divinity in its individuality and specifity. Comparative Theology mediates between the universality of the philosophical discourse and the uniqueness of our individual experience (symbolized by a sacred person--such as Jesus, Brahman, Buddha or Mohammed) by reflecting and analyzing our religious experiences and practices. Religion may lose its specificity by comparative conceptual analysis within the field of philosophy, but Comparative Theology may enhance the vital dimensions of the very same spiritual experience by placing them in a comparative perspective.
ACCESSION #
84445009

 

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