TITLE

THE POISONED CHALICE: IMPERIAL JUSTICE, MORAL RELATIVISM, AND THE ORIGINS OF INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW

AUTHOR(S)
Christie, H.
PUB. DATE
December 2010
SOURCE
University of Pittsburgh Law Review;2010, Vol. 72 Issue 2, p361
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on moral relativism and the origins of international criminal law. Topics include the criminalization of moral crimes, the enforcement of international criminal law, and international criminal tribunals. Information is provided on political influence on judicial rulemaking and the impact of imperial justice on modern law regimes.
ACCESSION #
80037377

 

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