TITLE

Perspective

PUB. DATE
October 1979
SOURCE
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists;Oct1979, Vol. 35 Issue 8, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents the author's views on nuclear disarmament. The author is discontent with the fact that despite numerous international conferences and negotiations on the subject, every war today carries the danger that it could spread and involve the superpowers. A military confrontation between the nuclear powers could entail the horrifying risk of nuclear warfare.
ACCESSION #
7995427

 

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