TITLE

WHY Do CITIZENS LITIGATE OVER THE POSTING OF THE TEN COMMANDMENTS? A CASE STUDY FROM TENNESSEE

AUTHOR(S)
Astoria, Ross
PUB. DATE
December 2012
SOURCE
Quinnipiac Law Review;2012, Vol. 30 Issue 4, p691
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the litigation regarding the posting of the Ten Commandments with respect to two cases filed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Tennessee on the same grounds. The cases were filed by the ACLU due to the violation of the federal laws of the U.S. by the counties namely Hamilton County and Rutherford County of Tennessee. Information on the decision of the Supreme Court of the U.S. regarding the cases is also presented.
ACCESSION #
78422962

 

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