TITLE

Lacanian Reading of Kamala Das's Poetic Expression

AUTHOR(S)
Qazi, Khursheed Ahmad
PUB. DATE
January 2012
SOURCE
Indian Streams Research Journal;Jan2012, Vol. 1 Issue 12, Special section p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
I had expected him to take me in his arms and stroke my hair, my hands and whisper loving words - Kamala Das This paper is simply an attempt to search for the presence of Lacanian notions of object petit and desire in Kamala Das's poetry because her poetry revolves around the theme of Love and Sex. We find her fully caught in Lacanian philosophy: "desire is always the desire of the other" (See, Seminar Bk. XI: 235). Lacanian Other refers to anything that contributes to the creation of our subjectivity or what we commonly refer to as our "selfhood". She is critically considered to be a subjective poet and her poems are usually outcome of uncontrollable emotion. From the psycho-analytical viewpoint, her poems appear evidently an attempt at exploration of the self and social assertion of individuality.
ACCESSION #
78383551

 

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