TITLE

Now, the Hard Part

AUTHOR(S)
Dehghanpisheh, Babak
PUB. DATE
October 2002
SOURCE
Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);10/14/2002 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 140 Issue 16, p40
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on Afghan women who continue to suffer harsh treatment, especially in areas outside Kabul. Account of Fahima, who was imprisoned along with her two young sons; Concerns of human-rights activists; Examples of how serious the problem remains; The danger of edicts enforced by provincial leaders; Why supporters of a liberal constitution face an uphill battle; Outlook for improving the stature of women in Afghanistan.
ACCESSION #
7514201

 

Related Articles

  • Now, the Hard Part. Dehghanpisheh, Babak // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);10/14/2002 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 140 Issue 16, p36 

    Focuses on Afghan women who continue to suffer harsh treatment, especially in areas outside Kabul. Account of Fahima, who was imprisoned along with her two young sons; Concerns of human-rights activists; Examples of how serious the problem remains; The danger of edicts enforced by provincial...

  • Keep promises to Afghans: Amnesty.  // South Asian Post;10/13/2011, p16 

    The article reports on the statement of Amnesty International, saying that it is up to the Afghan government and its international supporters to back hopes of progress and actions to defend them after human rights are at risk by corruption and insurgent attacks contempt human rights in Afghanistan.

  • Beyond the burqa. Sibbald, Barbara // CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;2/5/2002, Vol. 166 Issue 3, p368 

    Profiles Dr. Sima Samar, Afghanistan minister of women's affairs. How she defied Afghani law by providing education and health care to women; Biographical information, including her role in the resistance movement in Afghanistan when it was attacked by the Soviet Union; How she managed to...

  • Hope remains fragile in Afghanistan. Herlinger, Chris // National Catholic Reporter;1/11/2008, Vol. 44 Issue 10, p17 

    The author reflects on the sociopolitical and economic condition in Afghanistan, which is in the middle of war and violence. He quotes a description from a human rights activist depicting the country as depleted and in serious disrepair infrastructure. He has been told by a teacher at a...

  • "Idon't fear death - I fear political silence". Laycock, Kate // New Statesman;1/2/2012, Vol. 141 Issue 5086, p8 

    The article focuses on Malalai Joya, a political and women's rights activist in Afghanistan. Joya strongly criticizes Afghanistan's government, but also says that the occupation of her country by U.S. and other armed forces in the Afghan War has discredited democracy and human rights as...

  • FEMINISTS IN BURKHAS. Eagar, Charlotte // Prospect;Feb2007, Issue 131, p54 

    This article explores Afghanistan following the U.S. invasion of 2001 and the current struggle to institute women's rights. Several women of varying social stature are highlighted, from serial killer Shirin Gul who is portrayed prominently in the media, to an anonymous woman who frequents a...

  • Malalai Joya: Australia is making Afghanistan worse.  // Green Left Weekly;9/7/2011, Issue 894, p10 

    An interview with Malalai Joya, a writer, activist, and former parliamentarian in the national assembly of Afghanistan, is presented. Joya discusses issues concerning the occupation and resistance in Afghanistan. She notes that the presence of Australian troops in Afghanistan only benefits the...

  • THE WOMEN OF AFGHANISTAN FIND A LEADER. Bruton, F. Brinley // New Statesman;9/19/2005, Vol. 134 Issue 4758, p18 

    Focuses on Afghani politician Malalai Joya. Review of how Joya is a candidate in Afghanistan's parliamentary elections on September 18, 2005; Suggestion that unlike other female candidates, Joya can count on broad male support; Criticism levied by Joya against the government for its inclusion of...

  • Sharia in Kabul? Shea, Nina // National Review;10/28/2002, Vol. 54 Issue 20, p20 

    The article focuses on the imminent danger of Afghanistan's political reconstruction as an Islamic state under hard-line sharia law. Shortly after Afghanistan's cabinet was announced, new chief justice Fazul Hadi Shinwari criticized the newly appointed women's affairs minister, Sima Samar, for...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics