TITLE

INTERFERENCE BETWEEN VERBAL CONCEPT FORMATION AND SPATIAL MENTAL ROTATION IN FEMALE SUBJECTS

AUTHOR(S)
Makány, Tamás; Karádi, Kázmér; Kállai, János; Nadel, Lynn
PUB. DATE
August 2002
SOURCE
Perceptual & Motor Skills;Aug2002, Vol. 95 Issue 1, p227
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines the relationship between spatial cognition and verbal intelligence abilities of women. Components of spatial cognition; Value of intelligence test; Design of the Hungarian Wechsler Intelligence Scale.
ACCESSION #
7506786

 

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