TITLE

THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT AND JUSTICE ON THE GROUND

AUTHOR(S)
Stromseth, Jane E.
PUB. DATE
March 2011
SOURCE
Arizona State Law Journal;Spring2011, Vol. 43 Issue 1, p427
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the evaluation of the U.S. International Criminal Court (ICC) and hybrid criminal courts contribution to justice on the ground in the directly crimes affected societies in Uganda. It depicts that these courts are legally prosecuting criminal issues and requisites the need of better approach for the societies. It informs that a bit more vision, effort, planning and resources, the courts can do more to advance justice in the atrocities affected societies.
ACCESSION #
74118466

 

Related Articles

  • A Workshop, a Symposium and the Katanga Trial Judgment of 7 March 2014. Ambos, Kai // Journal of International Criminal Justice;May2014, Vol. 12 Issue 2, p219 

    No abstract available.

  • INTERNATIONAL LAW AND THE CLOSURE OF THE INTERNATIONAL AND HYBRID CRIMINAL TRIBUNALS. Oosterveld, Valerie // American Society of International Law: Proceedings of the Annual;2010, p37 

    The author discusses highlights of a panel discussion on international law and the international and hybrid criminal tribunals. She cites some legal and practical issues resulting from the closure of international and hybrid criminal tribunals, the trials of outstanding fugitives who may be...

  • Searching for the Hinterman. Ohlin, Jens David // Journal of International Criminal Justice;May2014, Vol. 12 Issue 2, p325 

    How should international courts distinguish between principals and accessories? The ICC answered this question with Roxin’s Control Theory of Perpetration; defendants should be convicted as principals if they control the crime individually, jointly with a co-perpetrator, indirectly via an...

  • Tribunals and War Crimes Trials: Treatment of the Press. Cruvellier, Thierry // Nieman Reports;Summer2008, Vol. 62 Issue 2, p89 

    The article examines the issues confronting journalists who report on the work of international criminal courts created by the United Nations for trying persons accused of crimes against humanity. There have been a series of disputes in Cambodia and the former Yugoslavia in which reporters...

  • Hybrid and Internationalised Criminal Tribunals: Selected Jurisdictional Issues. MEHIGAN, JAMES // Australian International Law Journal;2011, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p283 

    No abstract available.

  • THE ROLE OF STATES IN THE CLOSURE OF THE INTERNATIONAL AND HYBRID CRIMINAL TRIBUNALS. Joyce, Anne // American Society of International Law: Proceedings of the Annual;2010, p43 

    The author examines the role of some countries in the closure of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). A definition of a successful closure of the international and hybrid criminal tribunals is provided. The...

  • Unfair and Partial. Griffiths, Courtenay // Time International (Asia Edition);9/30/2013, Vol. 182 Issue 14, p54 

    The article presents the author's thoughts, as of September 30, 2013, on the International Criminal Court (ICC) which has been accused of being racist by the African Union intergovernmental organization. The article notes all 30 defendants that have been indicted by the ICC for crimes against...

  • An African now heads the ICC - what next? Eze, Mercy // New African;Jan2012, Issue 513, p40 

    The article focuses on the effect of Fatou Bensouda being the chief prosecutor of International Criminal Court (ICC). It states that Bensouda was the former attorney general and minister for justice of Gambia and was the deputy prosecutor. It mentions that Bensouda face a challenge regarding the...

  • The United Nations War Crimes Commission's Proposal For An International Criminal Court. Schabas, William // Criminal Law Forum;Jun2014, Vol. 25 Issue 1/2, p171 

    The article examines the evolution of proposals for and debates around the establishment of a permanent international criminal court. Taking as its starting point discussions conducted in the context of the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, the article focuses on the various domestic, regional and...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics