TITLE

Teaching Non-Violence

AUTHOR(S)
Fox, Helen
PUB. DATE
May 2010
SOURCE
At the Interface / Probing the Boundaries;2010, Vol. 64, p237
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In-depth interviews with undergraduates at a high ranking, politically liberal U.S. university suggest that young adults who are most likely to occupy future positions of influence are sceptical of the idea that a world without war is possible. Despite their aversion to war in general and the Iraq war in particular, these students nearly always said they believe that war is an integral part of human nature and that peaceful international relations will always be subverted by individuals and/or groups that insist on taking advantage of others. When students defended the need for war, they did not cite international terrorism or self defence as just causes, but rather the responsibility to protect defenceless others such as villagers in Darfur or Jews in Hitler's Germany. However, students knew little about the prevalence and efficacy of non-violent movements or the range of diplomatic and political tactics that have been employed to deter violence. The author shares the content and methods of her seminar on non-violence, and concludes that more courses in secondary schools and universities need to fill the gaps in students' knowledge by teaching historical, social, political, and psychological information about both war and peaceful solutions to conflict.
ACCESSION #
70457428

 

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