TITLE

Someone You Know Is Having a Tough Time Talking to Their Children About…um, Stuff

AUTHOR(S)
Dreyer, Jennifer
PUB. DATE
October 2011
SOURCE
La Prensa San Diego;10/28/2011, Vol. 35 Issue 43, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the difficult times which the parents face while giving sex education to their children and also focuses on the importance of a better interpersonal communication between the family members.
ACCESSION #
69617422

 

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