TITLE

National Academy of Sciences Weighs In On Stem Cell Research

PUB. DATE
October 2001
SOURCE
JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute;10/3/2001, Vol. 93 Issue 19, p1447
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents the science and policy report on stem cell by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Potential of stem cells for treatment; Importance of public funding for research of human stem cells; Supervision of the funded stem cell research by group of scientist and ethicists.
ACCESSION #
6777510

 

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