TITLE

ENDING INDEFINITE DETENTION OF NON-CITIZENS

AUTHOR(S)
BRAMANTE, ANDREW
PUB. DATE
March 2011
SOURCE
Case Western Reserve Law Review;Spring2011, Vol. 61 Issue 3, p933
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on the indefinite detention of non-American citizens and the denial of their constitutional rights by courts. It explores the evolution of their rights according to habeas corpus review. It presents the impact of the due process issues and the detention of immigrants on the community.
ACCESSION #
64393648

 

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