TITLE

The Science and Values of Administration--I

AUTHOR(S)
de Grazia, Alfred
PUB. DATE
December 1960
SOURCE
Administrative Science Quarterly;Dec60, Vol. 5 Issue 3, p362
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In the first of two parts the author, asserting that all action is purposive, calls group-performed habitual actions "administration." The task of administrative science is to generalize about all administrative situations. How the science selects and abstracts data and chooses and phrases propositions is described. An administered situation has actors (sponsors or executives, participants, and clientele), targets (goals), and effects. Goals are substantive and instrumental, and include especially power, wealth, and prestige. Power and control constitute the core value, reflected in the preponderance of deductive operations. Organizations formed around wealth and prestige tend to become executive-power centered. The wealth value is especially compatible with clientele-centered organizations, the prestige value with participant-centered groups.
ACCESSION #
6439306

 

Related Articles

  • A Life Cycle Approach to Management by Objectives. Hollmann, Robert W.; Tansik, David A. // Academy of Management Review;Oct77, Vol. 2 Issue 4, p678 

    In this article the authors examine the management practice known as management by objectives (MBO) and discuss how the process is designed to work. They note that many companies abandon MBO strategies prematurely due to their concern for immediate results. They compare the MBO process to the...

  • Hawthorne, Topeka, and the Issue of Science Versus Advocacy in Organizational Behavior. Yorks, Lyle; Whitsett, David A. // Academy of Management Review;Jan1985, Vol. 10 Issue 1, p21 

    Many organizational behaviorists adopt dual roles in the course of their careers: as scientists with an academic responsibility for scholarship and as consultants advocating what they believe to be more effective organizational forms and managerial methods. This paper examines how these dual...

  • Participation In Goal-Setting Programs: An Attributional Analysis. Chacko, Thomas I.; Stone, Thomas H.; Brief, Arthur P. // Academy of Management Review;Jul1979, Vol. 4 Issue 3, p433 

    This article offers a conceptual framework to examine the multiple dimensions of goal-oriented management programs such as management by objectives through the use of attribution theory. In organizational literature, participation has most often been used to describe group decision making where...

  • Authority Relations in Different Organizational Systems. Limerick, David C. // Academy of Management Review;Oct76, Vol. 1 Issue 4, p56 

    Reactions of organizational participants to authority relations can be understood by examining the total organizational system in which authority relations are embedded. Differences in such relations, and reactions to them, are examined within the framework of a matrix of organizational systems...

  • WHEN CONFIDENCE COMES TOO SOON: COLLECTIVE EFFICACY, CONFLICT AND GROUP PERFORMANCE OVER TIME. GONCALO, JACK A.; POLMAN, EVAN G. // Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings;2007, Vol. 2007 Issue 1, p1 

    The article examines how collective efficacy, which is defined as a group's shared belief that they can execute a task successfully, affects group performance over time. The article explains that the perception behind collective efficacy is mostly positive, because it allows the group to set...

  • THE ORGANIZATIONAL TAXONOMY: DEFINITION AND DESIGN. Rich, Philip // Academy of Management Review;Oct92, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p758 

    Organizational typologies provide an effective data storage and retrieval system, as well as a means for theory development. However, existing typologies are typically limited, failing to meet broad standards. This article discusses contemporary organizational classification in the context of...

  • CREATING AN ETHICAL CULTURE. GEBLER, DAVID // Strategic Finance;May2006, Vol. 87 Issue 11, p28 

    The article refers to the 2005 National Business Ethics Survey from the Ethics Resource Center and a trend toward building ethical corporate cultures in the United States. Previously, the focus had been on building compliance infrastructures. The survey attributes the shift to ineffective ethics...

  • Building better bureaucracies. Adler, Paul S. // Academy of Management Executive;Nov99, Vol. 13 Issue 4, p36 

    Colloquially speaking, bureaucracy means red tape, over-controlling bosses, and apathetic employees. But large-scale organizations need appropriately designed formalized procedures and hierarchical structure to avoid chaos and assure efficiency, quality, and timeliness. We currently lack...

  • No Innate Phases in Group Problem Solving. Seeger, John A. // Academy of Management Review;Oct83, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p683 

    A widely accepted empirical study (Bales & Strodtbeck, 1951)) concludes that "many staff conferences, committees, and similar groups" progress through predictable sequential phases in problem solving. Reexamination suggests that the conclusion is wrong. Only those subject groups that had never...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics