TITLE

Congress Ignored Constitution to Pass Campaign Bill

AUTHOR(S)
Sowell, Thomas
PUB. DATE
February 2002
SOURCE
Human Events;2/25/2002, Vol. 58 Issue 8, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Argues that the U.S. House ignored the Constitution when it passed the campaign finance reform legislation. Last line of defense of the Constitution; Popularity of campaign finance reform; Views of media on campaign contributions.
ACCESSION #
6294135

 

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