TITLE

Concrete needs no metaphor: Globalized fences as sites of political struggle

AUTHOR(S)
Feigenbaum, Anna
PUB. DATE
May 2010
SOURCE
Ephemera: Theory & Politics in Organization;May2010, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p119
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In this paper I argue for a conceptualization of material fences as artifacts of globalization, or as what I term ‘globalized fences’. I construct this category to bring together a diversity of fences that share similar attributes, including the separation fence in Israel/Palestine, the fence at the U.S./Mexico border, the fences surrounding immigration detention centers and the fences fortifying the temporary sites of global superpower gatherings. From this overview of globalized fences, I move to examine such fences from the vantage point of protest networks. HereI look at two specific types of struggles lodged against, and at the site of, such fences. The first includes resistance that uses the ‘fence as canvas’ and the second at struggles that engage the ‘fence as ICT’. I look at these two sets of protest practices as communicative acts that are able to ‘make fences talk,’ insisting that concrete is far more than a metaphor for the violence of containment.
ACCESSION #
62639689

 

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