TITLE

Online forecasts take guesswork out of water management

AUTHOR(S)
Wynne, Laura
PUB. DATE
April 2011
SOURCE
Ecos;Apr/May2011, Issue 160, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Blog Entry
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the launch of a new Seasonal Streamflow Forecasting service developed by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial research Organisation (CSIRO) and the Bureau of Meteorology in Australia. It mentions that the information resources will be useful for farmers within the forecast area. It notes that the service is based on advanced statistical modelling approach called Bayesian Joint Probability (BJP), which provides information on water inflows into major rivers.
ACCESSION #
62170967

 

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