TITLE

Information Access Guide

PUB. DATE
December 2010
SOURCE
Global Media Journal: Indian Edition;Dec2010, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers guidelines for gaining access to records maintained by the Department of State under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) in the U.S. It cites some exemption categories that grant government agencies an authority to refrain from disclosing information including sensitive matters related to law enforcement and national security. Moreover, it is noted that individuals can request information from the federal agency through mail, online or fax and can specify the fees they are willing to pay in processing their requests.
ACCESSION #
60982396

 

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