TITLE

Alexander the Great

AUTHOR(S)
Brown, Bryan
PUB. DATE
May 2011
SOURCE
Junior Scholastic;5/9/2011, Vol. 113 Issue 15, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on Alexander III of Macedonia who is referred as Alexander the Great and notes his successful conquests which laid the foundation of the Western empire which is Rome.
ACCESSION #
60685597

 

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