TITLE

Study Punctures Stereotypes About Social Status of Bullies

AUTHOR(S)
Shah, Nirvi
PUB. DATE
February 2011
SOURCE
Education Week;2/23/2011, Vol. 30 Issue 21, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses a study on bullying in U.S. schools which found that some stereotypes about which types of students are likely to be bullies are not necessarily true. It reports that students with middle status on school social hierarchies are the most likely to be bullies. The use of physical aggression, social aggression, and victimization in gaining social status is examined.
ACCESSION #
58699716

 

Related Articles

  • 10 Ways to Move Beyond Bully Prevention (And Why We Should). Brown, Lyn Mikel // Education Week;3/5/2008, Vol. 27 Issue 26, p29 

    The author reflects on the attention given to bully prevention programs. She provides alternative suggestions for addressing behavioral issues in school settings including ending the practice of labeling children, talking accurately about types of behavior, and understanding why children use...

  • Bullying Is Common -- and Subtle. Goodwin, Bryan // Educational Leadership;Sep2011, Vol. 69 Issue 1, p82 

    In this article the author discusses the prevalence, subtlety, and potentially fatal aspects of bullying in schools. He presents the case of sixth-grader Carl Walker-Hoover, who committed suicide in 2009 after being bullied by schoolmates, and suggests that such cases go to show that bullying is...

  • Relational Aggression Among Students. YOUNG, ELLIE L.; NELSON, DAVID A.; HOTTLE, AMERICA B.; WARBURTON, BRITTNEY; YOUNG, BRYAN K. // Education Digest;Mar2011, Vol. 76 Issue 7, p24 

    The article presents a condensed reprint of the article "Relational Aggression Among Students" by Ellie L. Young, David A. Nelson, America B. Hottle, Brittney Warburton, and Bryan K. Young, which appeared in the October 2010 issue of "Principal Leadership." It addresses the type of school...

  • DOES IT GET BETTER? FLANNERY, MARY ELLEN // NEA Today;Jan/Feb2011, Vol. 29 Issue 3, p38 

    The article discusses the problem of bullying in schools in the U.S. and explores the responsibility of educators to prevent bullying. The author addresses the suicide of several teenagers in 2010 and suggests that bullying prevention programs in schools do not adequately address the...

  • "The hand that holds the clicker": Youthful exposure to TV violence reaches to adulthood. Burke, Michael G. // Contemporary Pediatrics;May2003, Vol. 20 Issue 5, p21 

    Presents the results of a study that evaluated the link between viewing violence on television (TV) and childhood aggression among children growing up in Chicago, Illinois. TV-viewing variables in childhood significantly predictive of adult aggression; Scores in any of the variables more likely...

  • Ask a Girl.  // New Moon;Mar/Apr2007, Vol. 14 Issue 4, p10 

    The article presents pieces of advice on what to do with a boy who bullies his classmates.

  • STRUCTURAL DIMENSIONS OF THE SOCIAL REPRESENTATION OF AGGRESSION. GRAÑA GÓMEZ, JOSÉ LUIS; ANDREU, JOSE MANUEL; ROGERS, HEATHER LYNN; ARANGO LASPRILLA, JUAN CARLOS // Social Behavior & Personality: an international journal;2003, Vol. 31 Issue 3, p223 

    The principal aim of this study was to analyze the structural dimensions of social representation of aggression through the Expressive Representations of Aggression Scale - EXPAGG- (Campbell, Muncer, & Coyle, 1992). This scale is used in many studies of aggressive behavior among youth and in...

  • Confronting Campus Bullies. MYERS, VIRGINIA // Education Digest;May2012, Vol. 77 Issue 9, p45 

    An adaptation of the article "Confronting Campus Bullies: How Bullying Shows Up in the Halls of Academe, and What We Can Do About It," by Virginia Myers is presented, originally published in the November-December 2011 issue of the periodical "AFT On Campus."

  • Gender Differences in Reactive and Proactive Aggression. Connor, Daniel F.; Steingard, Ronald J.; Anderson, Jennifer J.; Melloni Jr., Richard H. // Child Psychiatry & Human Development;Summer2003, Vol. 33 Issue 4, p279 

    The purpose of our investigation was to study gender differences in proactive and reactive aggression in a sample of 323 clinically referred children and adolescents (68 females and 255 males). Proactive aggression and reactive aggression were assessed using the Proactive/Reactive Aggression...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics