TITLE

A New Discourse Theory of the Firm After Citizens United

AUTHOR(S)
Siebecker, Michael R.
PUB. DATE
November 2010
SOURCE
George Washington Law Review;Nov2010, Vol. 79 Issue 1, p161
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses a new discourse theory of the firm following the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Citizens United v. FEC in 2010. The court has granted to corporations the same political speech rights as individuals in the case. The need for firms to have a greater voice in the deliberative process leading to the selection of directors is emphasized. One benefit of the theory is providing a continually reflective model that captures the dynamic relationship between managers and shareholders accurately.
ACCESSION #
56947815

 

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