TITLE

A Rawlsian Approach to International Criminal Justice and the International Criminal Court

AUTHOR(S)
Sadat, Leila Nadya
PUB. DATE
November 2010
SOURCE
Tulane Journal of International & Comparative Law;11/1/2010, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p261
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents the author's insights on the U.S. justice system and the international criminal justice system. The author notes the significance of establishing international cooperations that will impose moral and ethical values to Americans and international community. She notes the importance of fighting atrocity crimes through faith and hardwork on international justice. She also states that the International Criminal Court (ICC) has an insufficient ability to prevent atrocities.
ACCESSION #
56577064

 

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