TITLE

Other Immigrants: Mexicans and the Dillingham Commission of 1907-1911

AUTHOR(S)
BENTON-COHEN, KATHERINE
PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
Journal of American Ethnic History;Winter2011, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p33
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses Mexican immigrants in the United States during the early twentieth century and focuses on the views of the U.S. Immigration Commission, also known as the Dillingham Commission. It notes that U.S. officials were more focused on European and Asian immigrants, particularly Italians and Japanese, during this period. The author explores Mexicans' exemptions from certain immigration restrictions, including quotas and literacy tests. U.S. policies and racial attitudes are explored within a colonial framework. The article also discusses several U.S. politicians on the Dillingham Commission, including senators William Paul Dillingham and Henry Cabot Lodge as well as Representative John Burnett.
ACCESSION #
56545178

 

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