TITLE

Developing Country Orientations Toward Foreign Technology in the Eighties: Implications for New Negotiation Approaches

AUTHOR(S)
Wallender III, Harvey W.
PUB. DATE
June 1980
SOURCE
Columbia Journal of World Business;Summer80, Vol. 15 Issue 2, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
At both the intergovernmental and national levels, a variety of changes are taking place, which affect the U.S. firms and their strategies toward technology sale and transfer. Changes toward greater restrictions in some areas and more liberalization in others make the current foreign environment a turbulent one. A closer examination of activities at the global and specific country level suggests that, while the turbulence may subside in many regions, the resulting environment will require significant modification of business strategies and negotiation approaches of foreign suppliers. The past decade of intergovernmental debates reflects the direction and underlying strategies for development being pursued by developing countries. Concern with the appropriate role of foreign technology and capital was first articulated over 20 years ago and contributed to an extremely turbulent period during 1965 to 1975. This epoch has now given way to a less dramatic era of nationalism, tempered by more conservative government limitations on international business.
ACCESSION #
5553549

 

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