TITLE

World Nuclear Energy: How Competitive?

AUTHOR(S)
Sporn, Philip
PUB. DATE
September 1969
SOURCE
Columbia Journal of World Business;Sep/Oct69, Vol. 4 Issue 5, p71
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
There is a belief in many quarters that in the past five years a breakthrough has occurred in the application of atomic power and that it is today, if not quite completely, at least substantially competitive with conventional or fossil fuels in the United States and in the rest of the world. In the United States, there is perhaps an additional opinion that, while the country had a relatively slow start in the application of nuclear power, it is now catching up with Europe and particularly with England. There is some reason for both these beliefs. Whether the reasons are substantial is another question. By 1970 the total capacity to be installed in the United States will be 340,000 mw, of which nuclear will represent 10,000 mw, or practically 3% of the total. It would appear that by 1970 there will be substantial equality in nuclear installed capacity between OECD Europe and the United States. The United States now has potentially a more solidly established nuclear energy industry than has ever been attained by any other segment of the energy industry in so brief a period.
ACCESSION #
5540921

 

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