TITLE

HEARING THE SILENCES IN LINCOLN'S TEMPERANCE ADDRESS: WHIG MASCULINITY AS AN ETHIC OF RHETORICAL CIVILITY

AUTHOR(S)
ZAESKE, SUSAN
PUB. DATE
September 2010
SOURCE
Rhetoric & Public Affairs;Fall2010, Vol. 13 Issue 3, p389
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Abraham Lincoln's 1842 Temperance Address can be understood as an act of cultural criticism delivered in epideictic form in which the young politician demonstrated his leadership ability by presenting his political philosophy. Lincoln exploited the capacious indeterminacy of meaning afforded by the discourse of the flourishing temperance movement to address indirectly problems plaguing the American republic, namely incivility and slavery. Off ering only hushed praise for Washington, Lincoln silenced the slaveholding founders so that the sensibilities of a new generation of men could be heard. Lincoln constructed a Whig manhood grounded in ideals of entrepreneurialism and restraint that demonstrated his fitness to lead his party and the Second American Revolution.
ACCESSION #
55358993

 

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