TITLE

China Raises Deposit and Lending Rates

PUB. DATE
November 2010
SOURCE
China Chemical Reporter;11/6/2010, Vol. 21 Issue 21, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the move of People's Bank of China to raise one-year deposit rates to 2.5% and one-year lending rates to 5.56% to curve inflation and cool speculative property investments and house purchases in China.
ACCESSION #
55120561

 

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