TITLE

SPOMENI BOŽICE DIJANE IZ KOLONIJE CLAUDIA AEQUUM I LOGORA TILURIUM

AUTHOR(S)
Milićević Bradač, Marina
PUB. DATE
December 2009
SOURCE
Opuscula Archaeologica;2009, Vol. 33, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Several portrayals of Diana have been discovered in the vicinity of Sinj, particularly in the area of the Aequum colony and the Tilurium military camp. Most take the form of the goddess hunting, and often there are also dedications to Diana in inscriptions, in which she is also referred to as Diana Augusta. The dating and character of these monuments may be associated with political and social events in the Empire from the reign of Hadrian onward. These events were reflected in the lives of Roman soldiers, veterans and citizens of the Sinj region who left behind these monuments.
ACCESSION #
54425646

 

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