TITLE

Yes He Kan?

AUTHOR(S)
Harris, Tobias
PUB. DATE
June 2010
SOURCE
Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);6/28/2010 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 155/156 Issue 26/1, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
An article is presented that discusses Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan and his work with the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ). The article discusses Kan's 2010 election following the resignation of Yukio Hatoyama, noting increased public support for the DPJ. Information is also provided on Kan's credentials, his secretary-general Yukio Edano, and the establishment of his political cabinet.
ACCESSION #
53732165

 

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