TITLE

Animal behaviour: Avian optical illusions

PUB. DATE
September 2010
SOURCE
Nature;9/16/2010, Vol. 467 Issue 7313, p255
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the study conducted by John Endler and colleagues at Deakin University in Geelong, Victoria, which founds that male great bowerbird create optical illusions with their bowers within two weeks and restored the size gradients within three days.
ACCESSION #
53718113

 

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