TITLE

Debate over racial profiling intensifies on the Hill

AUTHOR(S)
Chaddock, Gail Russell
PUB. DATE
October 2001
SOURCE
Christian Science Monitor;10/4/2001, Vol. 93 Issue 218, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the scrutiny of the practice of racial profiling in law enforcement in the United States following terrorist attacks on the U.S.
ACCESSION #
5270520

 

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