TITLE

WHAT THE ANIMALS HAVE TO SAY: CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORKS, COMMONALITIES AND TENSIONS IN PROFESSIONAL ANIMAL PSI RESEARCH AND LAY-ANIMAL PSYCHIC COMMUNICATION

AUTHOR(S)
Williams, Carl; Dutton, Diane
PUB. DATE
April 2010
SOURCE
Journal of the Society for Psychical Research;Apr2010, Vol. 74 Issue 899, p94
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This paper examines themes found in professional parapsychological animal psi (anpsi) research, early lay observations of animal behaviour (such as by Edmund Selous) and the modern lay field of animal communication. Examining the discourse, metaphors and theories offered by these quite different perspectives permits some reflections on professional anpsi research in comparison with common-sense approaches to animal psi. This permits discussion of the contingent nature of knowledge, the role of conceptual frameworks and personal stances in constructing psi theories and evaluating evidence. In comparing these domains a number of assumptions, orienting and generative metaphors are identified which allow some assessment of the conceptual frameworks behind these attempts to understand animal psi. In addition, we also examine the controversial nature of anecdotal evidence, the way anpsi is constructed, including the use of evolutionary theory and the metaphors and models proposed. We also consider the practicalities of animal research, the process of relating to animals, and the role of debate and rhetoric in anpsi work.
ACCESSION #
52366154

 

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