TITLE

Differential Acoustical Cues for Palatalized vs Nonpalatalized Prevocalic Sonants in Lithuanian

AUTHOR(S)
AMBRAZEVIČIUS, Rytis
PUB. DATE
January 2010
SOURCE
Man & the Word / Zmogus ir zodis;2010, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The phenomenon of [i]-like (secondary) palatalization is discussed. The results of measurements of F2 and F3 loci for prevocalic palatalized and nonpalatalized sonants in the standard Lithuanian language are presented. The methods of acoustical analysis (Praat-aided) and statistical analysis were applied. The results confirm the general findings for other languages, namely that F2 loci are the most significant cues for differentiation between palatalized and nonpalatalized consonants. The dependence of loci on the place of articulation and of the succeeding vowels is discussed. This is the first study on F2 loci as the differential acoustical cues for palatalization of consonants in Lithuania. The methods could be applied to future researches on palatalization and general acoustical research on consonants in Lithuanian.
ACCESSION #
52287007

 

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