TITLE

Spending Spree

AUTHOR(S)
Nicholas, Adele
PUB. DATE
April 2010
SOURCE
InsideCounsel;Apr2010, Vol. 21 Issue 220, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses a court case wherein the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that corporate expenditure of independent political advertisements for candidate elections cannot be limited under the First Amendment to the Constitution. In Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the court decided that the Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act of 2002, which prohibits corporations from paying for electioneering communications, was unconstitutional as applied to the case. The advantages and disadvantages of the decision to corporations are also provided.
ACCESSION #
52285623

 

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