TITLE

Introduction to Special Issue

AUTHOR(S)
Dickinson, Greg
PUB. DATE
January 2010
SOURCE
Western Journal of Communication;Jan/Feb2010, Vol. 74 Issue 1, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents information about the essays that deal with rhetorical criticism that are featured in this special issue of "Western Journal of Communication." Essays were written by Scott Stroud, Pete Simonson, Stephen Hartnett and others.
ACCESSION #
49152790

 

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