TITLE

Renaissance Faciality

AUTHOR(S)
Loh, Maria H.
PUB. DATE
October 2009
SOURCE
Oxford Art Journal;Oct2009, Vol. 32 Issue 3, p341
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In 1966 John Pope-Hennessy declared in Portrait in the Renaissance that 'portrait painting is empirical'. It consolidated a certain model not only for the study of Renaissance portraiture anchored around the cult of the individual, but also for the Renaissance as a field of inquiry built upon the anachronistic precept of Renaissance individualism. This paper proposes another history of the portrait in early-modern Italian art that turns from the humanism of Renaissance faces to engage with the abstraction of Renaissance faciality. Faciality is used here to interrogate the knowledge that has been produced by these silent faces of the past and to deterritorialise portraiture from the heroic model of the Renaissance individual. The discussion will focus upon the mythical faces of Michelangelo in art history.
ACCESSION #
48015020

 

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