TITLE

Don't Negotiate with the Taliban

AUTHOR(S)
Fryklund, Inge
PUB. DATE
December 2009
SOURCE
Foreign Policy in Focus;12/31/2009, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In this article the author examines the futility of adopting negotiation as a solution to ending the Afghan problem as it cannot be addressed or solved by force. It is suggested that the absence of good governance is the reason for the problem, not the presence of the Taliban. The author argues that negotiating with the Taliban is tantamount to giving the extremists a victory that they could not otherwise win.
ACCESSION #
47835115

 

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