TITLE

GAO faults OSHA's workplace injury data collection system

AUTHOR(S)
Casale, Jeff
PUB. DATE
November 2009
SOURCE
Business Insurance;11/23/2009, Vol. 43 Issue 42, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on a report released by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) which states that workplace injury and illness data that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) uses to assess workplace safety may be insufficient. It mentions that workplace injuries and illnesses often are unrecorded by employers and some avoid reporting workplace injuries and illnesses due to fear of jeopardizing workers compensation premium discounts. Observes say, insufficient data hampers the efforts of OSHA to encourage workplace safety.
ACCESSION #
46820287

 

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