TITLE

International Human Rights Treaties Can Make a Difference

AUTHOR(S)
Rosati, Kristen B.
PUB. DATE
January 2001
SOURCE
Human Rights;Winter2001, Vol. 28 Issue 1, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Human rights advocates often are frustrated with the slow pace of the U.S. recognition and implementation of international human rights treaties. Neither the Convention on the Rights of the Child nor the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, has been ratified by the U.S. Other treaties, such as the United Nations Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees, although ratified, have been partially superseded by inconsistent domestic immigration laws. One recent example of U.S. human rights treaty implementation, however, may restore faith, to a small extent, that international human rights treaties can make a difference in the U.S. Implementation of Article 3 of the United Nations Convention against torture is desperately needed in the U.S. Despite the horrifying persecution that many refugees face if returned to their home countries, U.S. immigration law has become increasingly restrictive in granting relief to these individuals. The illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996, which amended the Immigration and Nationality Act, erected a daunting set of barriers to relief for legitimate refugees.
ACCESSION #
4236953

 

Related Articles

  • THE PACIFIC ISLAND STATES: THEMES EMERGING FROM THE UNITED NATIONS HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL'S INAUGURAL UNIVERSAL PERIODIC REVIEW? Smith, Rhona K. M. // Melbourne Journal of International Law;2012, Vol. 13 Issue 1, p569 

    This commentary reviews the Universal Periodic Review experience of the Pacific Island states. Under the auspices of the new United Nations Human Rights Council, every UN member state, including the 12 Pacific Island states holding UN membership, underwent the Universal Periodic Review in 2011....

  • Not Just Window Dressing.  // Wilson Quarterly;Summer2012, Vol. 36 Issue 3, p64 

    The article examines the impact of treaties enacted by the United Nations (UN) from 1981 to 2007 in 148 countries. It references the article "Human Rights as Mythand Ceremony? Re-evaluating the Effectivenessof Human Rights Treaties, 1981--2007" by Wade M. Cole that was published in "American...

  • EU declaration on the 50th anniversary of the 1951 Convention relating to the 1951 convention relating to the status of refugees.  // Refugee Survey Quarterly;Jan2001, Vol. 20 Issue 3, p129 

    The article provides information on the commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the 1951 Convention on the Status of Refugees on July 28, 2001. The event celebrates the declaration of the Convention held at the Tampere Summit. It encourages all States to join the ratification of the 1951...

  • The Strength of Weak Review: National Courts, Interpretive Canons, and Human Rights Treaties. Lupu, Yonatan; Verdier, Pierre-Hugues; Versteeg, Mila // International Studies Quarterly;Sep2019, Vol. 63 Issue 3, p507 

    Enforcement of international law is often delegated to national courts, creating a space for them to play a part in international judicialization. Under what conditions can they do so? We argue that the answer depends on the relationship between the political and legal constraints national...

  • UN Committee hails South Sudan's ratification of Convention on the Rights of the Child.  // African Business News;5/4/2015, p1 

    No abstract available.

  • Conventional wisdom. Clements, Luke // Community Care;6/5/2008, Issue 1725, p30 

    The article focuses on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which came into force in May 2008 and will be binding in Great Britain after the government ratifies it later in 2008. The convention is the first new human rights treaty of the 21st century and the...

  • From Humanitarian Discretion to Complementary Protection - Reflections on the Emergence of Human Rights-based Refugee Protection in Australia. McADAM, JANE // Australian International Law Journal;2011, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p53 

    For many years, Australia stood alone among industrialised countries for its failure to provide 'complementary protection' to people who are not refugees, but who are nonetheless at risk of return to serious human rights abuses in their country of origin or former habitual residence. The passage...

  • Establishing arbitrariness. Phillips, Stephen // Forced Migration Review;Sep2013, Vol. 1 Issue 44, p9 

    The article explains how to establish arbitrariness in the context of international human rights law involving immigration detention. It refers to the dominance of discourses around national security and notions of territorial sovereignty as a factor to understanding deprivations of liberty. It...

  • Taking Remedies Seriously: The Normative Implications of Risking Torture. Prasanna, Tanusri // Columbia Journal of Transnational Law;2012, Vol. 50 Issue 2, p370 

    The article presents the risk of torture and its prohibition in international law. It defines a framework which examines the risk level of standards of proscription of transfers under the international human rights instruments and the U.S. immigration law. It reflects the torcher jurisprudence...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics