TITLE

Introduction

AUTHOR(S)
Kanstroom, Daniel
PUB. DATE
January 2001
SOURCE
Human Rights;Winter2001, Vol. 28 Issue 1, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In April 1996, one year after the Oklahoma City bombing, the U.S. President Bill Clinton signed into law the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996. A few months later, the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 was enacted. Together, these laws constituted one of the most comprehensive revisions of the U.S. immigration law ever undertaken. They rank among the most strenuous attacks on the rights of noncitizen and the legal structures designed to protect those rights that the nation has ever seen. Vigorous enforcement of these laws by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) has subjected thousands of noncitizens and their families to unfathomably harsh treatment by government agents. Deportation grounds were made retroactive, so people are now deported for conduct that did not violate immigration law when it occurred INS detention was made mandatory for various types of cases — so people including many who have been lawful permanent residents since early childhood — have been incarcerated with no right and no realistic hope of release.
ACCESSION #
4236944

 

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