TITLE

The Wages of No

PUB. DATE
March 2001
SOURCE
National Review;3/5/2001, Vol. 53 Issue 4, p17
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the current political conditions in Israel with reference to Israel-Palestine foreign relations. Ariel Sharon has been elected as Israeli Prime Minister after Ehud Barak. Outgoing Prime Minister Barak surprised many Israelis by giving concessions to Palestinians. Majority of Palestinians hope for peace in the region. There are apprehensions whether Sharon will be able to establish a stable government.
ACCESSION #
4110029

 

Related Articles

  • Voting for Sharon, Hoping for the Best. Hammer, Joshua; Chen, Joanna; Ephron, Dan // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);02/12/2001 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 137 Issue 7, p24 

    Discusses the Israeli elections for Prime Minister. Suggestion that the disappointment of many former Ehud Barak supporters far outweighs the dread they feel about Ariel Sharon; View that Sharon represents a drastic but necessary remedy.

  • Voting for Sharon, Hoping for the Best. Hammer, Joshua; Chen, Joanna; Ephron, Dan // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);02/12/2001 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 137 Issue 7, p32 

    Discusses the Israeli elections for Prime Minister. Suggestion that the disappointment of many former Ehud Barak supporters far outweighs the dread they feel about Ariel Sharon; View that Sharon represents a drastic but necessary remedy.

  • Pierced. Halevi, Yossi Klein // New Republic;02/19/2001, Vol. 224 Issue 8, p16 

    Addresses the after effects of the 2001 prime ministerial election in Israel between Ariel Sharon and Ehud Barak. How Barak spent his final day in office, before being replaced by Sharon; Promise of Zionism to fulfill the Jews' two contradictory desires, to realize their messianic destiny and...

  • Landslide.  // New Republic;02/19/2001, Vol. 224 Issue 8, p9 

    Addresses the 2001 prime ministerial election in Israel between Ariel Sharon and Ehud Barak. Impact of the election of Sharon on the democratic process; Outlook for peace negotiations in the region between Israel and Palestine; Reactions to Sharon's presence at the Temple Mount just prior to the...

  • 'We'll See How Short Sharon's Fuse Really Is.' Hammer, Joshua; Ephron, Dan // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);02/19/2001 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 137 Issue 8, p24 

    Discusses prospects for the Israel-Arab peace process, in light of the election of Ariel Sharon as prime minister. Sharon's insistence that he will negotiate with the Palestinians only on his own terms; The violence between Israelis and Palestinians in 2000 and 2001; Political limitations on...

  • Israeli coalition is dangerous. Gordon, Neve // National Catholic Reporter;3/2/2001, Vol. 37 Issue 18, p19 

    Comments on the political and social struggles in Israel. Question on the leadership of politician Ariel Sharon; Description of the political propaganda spread by Sharon and fellow politician Ehud Barak; Threat to peace and democracy.

  • The Long March of A Founding Father. Romand, Andrew // Bulletin with Newsweek;1/17/2006, Vol. 124 Issue 6503, p40 

    The article chronicles the important events of the life of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. The life of Ariel Sharon--soldier, general, legislator, leader--has mirrored the story of his state. Marked by bloodshed and scarred by battle, both emerged from a half century of chaos and conflict...

  • Rebel With A Cause. Ephron, Dan // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);12/5/2005 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 146 Issue 23, p20 

    This article looks at Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's recent decision to leave his Likud party in the Israeli government to form a new centrist party called Kadima. Analysts believe Sharon left Likud because of a group of hardliners who oppose any appeasement with the Palestinians. It is...

  • Rebel With A Cause. Ephron, Dan // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);12/5/2005 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 146 Issue 23, p30 

    This article looks at Ariel Sharon's recent decision to leave his Likud party in the Israeli government to form a new centrist party called Kadima. Analysts believe Sharon left Likud because of a group of hardliners who oppose any appeasement with the Palestinians. It is believed that Sharon...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics