TITLE

Crimes Against International Law: Setting the Agenda

AUTHOR(S)
Warbrick, Colin
PUB. DATE
March 1998
SOURCE
Hume Papers on Public Policy;1998, Vol. 6 Issue 1/2, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on crimes against international law. Pressures on the agenda to establish an international criminal jurisdiction; Inadequacies of the international legal system; Prosecution in national legal systems; Use and non-use of criminal trials as part of a political process.
ACCESSION #
4012467

 

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