TITLE

NATIONALIZE THE BANKS, AND QUICK!

AUTHOR(S)
JOHNSON, SIMON; Weisser, Cybele
PUB. DATE
May 2009
SOURCE
Money;May2009, Vol. 38 Issue 5, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the nationalization of U.S. banks due to the global financial crisis. The U.S. government is attempting fiscal stimulus without nationalizing broken banks, the author states, which is a setup for a long recession. Other topics include realistically determining which banks are in trouble.
ACCESSION #
37570746

 

Related Articles

  • A Greek Tragedy.  // Canada & the World Backgrounder;Dec2011, Vol. 77 Issue 2, p33 

    The article discusses the national bankruptcy facing the Greek government. The financial problem is attributed to the 2008 banking crisis and the recession. It cites the increase in the salary of employees, as well as the inefficient operations of the government. Greece has been quoted as the...

  • Protecting against a collapsed lender. Campbell, David; Hrydziuszko, Derek // Journal of Corporate Treasury Management;May2009, Vol. 2 Issue 3, p265 

    The crisis in the international banking market of autumn 2008 — the bank bailouts, the collapse of Lehman Brothers and the Icelandic banking nationalisations — shone a light on something not previously dealt with in corporate loan documentation: what happens if a syndicate member...

  • Do Bank Bailouts Reduce or Increase Systemic Risk? The Effects of TARP on Financial System Stability. Berger, Allen N.; Roman, Raluca A.; Sedunov, John // Working Papers Series (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City);Sep2016, Vol. 16 Issue 8, Preceding p1 

    Theory suggests that bank bailouts may either reduce or increase systemic risk. This paper is the first to address this issue empirically, analyzing the U.S. Troubled Assets Relief Program (TARP). Difference-indifference analysis suggests that TARP significantly reduced contributions to systemic...

  • Endless Intervention? STUTTAFORD, ANDREW // National Review;11/17/2008, Vol. 60 Issue 21, p18 

    The author discusses the 2008 financial crisis in the U.S. and around the world and argues that although it was necessary for the U.S. government to intervene and give money to the banking sector, it must not interfere with the banks in how they use the money. Government officials have more...

  • Crisis? What Crisis? Average Bank Pay Kept Rising at the Same Rate. Wang, Marian // Pro Publica;3/27/2011, p14 

    A blog is presented, which discusses how the compensation of bank employees has been unaffected by the bailouts and the financial crisis in the U.S.

  • Stop the Free-Fall. Garten, Jeffrey E. // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);12/22/2008 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 152 Issue 25, p20 

    In this article the author addresses issues arising from the global financial crisis of 2008. He states that the crisis is greater than a mere recession and a that it could lead to world wide political instability. It is suggest that the answer to the economic decline is a concerted global...

  • Stop the Free-Fall. Garten, Jeffrey E. // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);12/22/2008 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 152 Issue 25, p14 

    In this article the author addresses issues arising from the global financial crisis of 2008. He states that the crisis is greater than a mere recession and a that it could lead to world wide political instability. It is suggest that the answer to the economic decline is a concerted global...

  • It Is Time For Baby Banks. EDABURN, PATRICK // Moderate Voice;10/24/2012, p4 

    The author discusses the significance of setting baby banks through legislation in the U.S. The recent financial crisis cost the U.S. nearly one trillion dollars in bailout fund to help support the banks and other financial institutions. These banks have gotten even bigger and the financial...

  • Make It Work. Lewitt, Michael E. // New Republic;11/5/2008, Vol. 239 Issue 8, p14 

    The article discusses the second U.S. plan to bail out the nation's banking system, and questions if this one will right the crisis. The author concludes that the U.S. credit crunch will ease because of increased trust in the banking system. The author states that the first plan to buy toxic...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics