TITLE

The 9/11 Commission and Torture

AUTHOR(S)
Shenon, Philip
PUB. DATE
March 2009
SOURCE
Newsweek;3/23/2009, Vol. 153 Issue 12, p43
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the 9/11 Commission report and its reliance on information that may have been derived from U.S. Central Intelligence Agency enhanced interrogation or waterboarding of qaida suspects. Information so derived is typically discredited. Democratic party members are calling for an investigation of the antiterrorism tactics that were used under the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush.
ACCESSION #
36965276

 

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