TITLE

The Rise and Fall of the Big, Bureaucratic Corporation

AUTHOR(S)
Kotkin, Joel
PUB. DATE
January 2000
SOURCE
American Enterprise;Jan/Feb2000, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p30
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the factors that have created a late-century change on entrepreneurship in the United States. Role of the change in consumer taste and the attitude of employees towards work; Impact of globalization and immigration; Discussion on the revolution in technology. INSETS: WHY SMALL COMPANIES OFTEN WORK BEST;BIG OR SMALL BUSINESSES NOW HAVE TO LISTEN TO THE LITTLE GUY.
ACCESSION #
3639833

 

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